When do you know if your web design is done?!

When do you know if your web design is done?!

When it comes to your website – the ever-changing online portal to your business – it can be hard to figure out when to stop working on your design.
Today, you’ll learn how to determine the right time to stop changing your web design, so you can move on to bigger and better things, for you and for your business.

Stop hiding behind the “construction” sign.

As long as you leave your work incomplete, you always have a reason to hold off on doing anything else beneficial for your company.
“I’m still building a website,” sounds important, like you’re in the middle of a big, special project. Yet, if you continue to focus solely on that aspect, you won’t be able to give attention to the other parts of your business such as your products and services, long-term visions or a feasible marketing strategy.

Your concern should be focused on getting rid of your “under construction” sign so that you can begin giving more of your time and effort to the profit-making aspects of your business.

Stop making adjustments out of fear.

A similar reason to the one above, making tweaks and changes to your site constantly takes away from your overall performance. Making the excuse that you, “aren’t quite finished” with your site can keep you from feeling as though you’ve completed anything worthwhile.
By nature, websites are a continuous work in progress. When you constantly make changes and updates to your site, it can manifest as a sign of unease or nervousness within other parts of your business.

It might make you feel better to change small parts of your site than to take on the challenges of creating other elements of your business that have the potential to add to your bottom line.

The best thing to do would be to work strategically. If you make changes to your site during part of an overall plan to streamline your services, this would be a better way to spend your time.

The next time you catch yourself mindlessly changing your HEX codes or frequently messing with your typeface combinations, just stop.
Then, take a few minutes to assess where the real concern lies and be sure that you’re not attempting to avoid a larger issue.

Have you covered the basics?

As you take a minute to glance over your sight, take note; does it have all the basics? Every site for every business should feature these key pages, which visitors are already expecting to find in your site navigation bar:

Home:

Your home page has the ability to make an impactful first impression. After seeing this page, any visitor should understand what it is you do, what you offer, and the clients you serve. This is the place where you should also be establishing your brand. Be sure to apply it consistently throughout your entire site.

About:

So, here it is. The secret to your About page that will make it compelling and intriguing to your visitors, is to talk about the people that you service, first. Everyone loves to read about themselves, which means that you can start out your page by sharing information about the type of people you work for, and what you can do for them. End your page with information about why your business deserves your clients trust. Include photos of you and anyone on your team, if you have one. This is also the perfect place for reviews and testimonials from your satisfied customers.

Products and Services:

This page is also frequently referred to s the ‘store’ or ‘shop’. This is the best place to locate any commerce or business transaction details that occur on your site. It should also be a place where your visitors can go to learn more about what you can offer them, and discover any products or services that might be suited to their needs. Be sure that this section of your site is fresh, uncluttered and easy to navigate. Make sure that your links and services on this page are always functional.

Contact:

Your contact page is the place that tells your visitors the best way to get in touch with you. It should be easy to read, easy to find and streamlined for functionality. Instead of choosing to post a generic email address on your page, consider using a simple form that will send you the information immediately after it has been submitted. This lets your visitor know you got their information, and saves them the step of having to take the time to email you.

If you’re reading Copyblogger or follow Hubspot, you likely understand the power of content marketing, meaning that this is a section of your website that is bound to appear in your navigation setup.

Blog:

This is your time to really shine with any extra information, guides, interaction and tips. Try to keep your posts updated by participating at least once a week, and be sure to break up your posts with good formatting. Include many images that will catch your reader’s eye and be sure to end with your call to action.

If, after reviewing your entire site, you feel that your basics have been covered, there is a good chance that your site is ready to launch right now. In the end, you can always add extra pages later or change things due to additions or plans for the future. Don’t be afraid of exposure!

I have met plenty of people who have had a tough time making their sites ready to go live, and I too know the feeling. If you’re using WordPress, you know that being able to change your look is as easy as switching to a new theme. If you have your site basics taken care of, commit to the site now, making only the most-important changes. Plan for your re-vamp in the future, if your site logistics aren’t working out for you down the road.

Know when to stop.

Your design is done when it’s successfully communicating to visitors what it is your business does and what makes it unique. It’s done when you’ve covered your basics, made yourself clear and it’s easy to use.

Try your best not to hide behind your web design project. Your site is only a means to an end…you, which is much more important than any single web page.

blogs

When do you know if your web design is done?!

When it comes to your website – the ever-changing online portal to your business – it can be hard to figure out when to stop working on your design.
Today, you’ll learn how to determine the right time to stop changing your web design, so you can move on to bigger and better things, for you and for your business.

Stop hiding behind the “construction” sign.

As long as you leave your work incomplete, you always have a reason to hold off on doing anything else beneficial for your company.
“I’m still building a website,” sounds important, like you’re in the middle of a big, special project. Yet, if you continue to focus solely on that aspect, you won’t be able to give attention to the other parts of your business such as your products and services, long-term visions or a feasible marketing strategy.

Your concern should be focused on getting rid of your “under construction” sign so that you can begin giving more of your time and effort to the profit-making aspects of your business.

Stop making adjustments out of fear.

A similar reason to the one above, making tweaks and changes to your site constantly takes away from your overall performance. Making the excuse that you, “aren’t quite finished” with your site can keep you from feeling as though you’ve completed anything worthwhile.
By nature, websites are a continuous work in progress. When you constantly make changes and updates to your site, it can manifest as a sign of unease or nervousness within other parts of your business.

It might make you feel better to change small parts of your site than to take on the challenges of creating other elements of your business that have the potential to add to your bottom line.

The best thing to do would be to work strategically. If you make changes to your site during part of an overall plan to streamline your services, this would be a better way to spend your time.

The next time you catch yourself mindlessly changing your HEX codes or frequently messing with your typeface combinations, just stop.
Then, take a few minutes to assess where the real concern lies and be sure that you’re not attempting to avoid a larger issue.

Have you covered the basics?

As you take a minute to glance over your sight, take note; does it have all the basics? Every site for every business should feature these key pages, which visitors are already expecting to find in your site navigation bar:

Home:

Your home page has the ability to make an impactful first impression. After seeing this page, any visitor should understand what it is you do, what you offer, and the clients you serve. This is the place where you should also be establishing your brand. Be sure to apply it consistently throughout your entire site.

About:

So, here it is. The secret to your About page that will make it compelling and intriguing to your visitors, is to talk about the people that you service, first. Everyone loves to read about themselves, which means that you can start out your page by sharing information about the type of people you work for, and what you can do for them. End your page with information about why your business deserves your clients trust. Include photos of you and anyone on your team, if you have one. This is also the perfect place for reviews and testimonials from your satisfied customers.

Products and Services:

This page is also frequently referred to s the ‘store’ or ‘shop’. This is the best place to locate any commerce or business transaction details that occur on your site. It should also be a place where your visitors can go to learn more about what you can offer them, and discover any products or services that might be suited to their needs. Be sure that this section of your site is fresh, uncluttered and easy to navigate. Make sure that your links and services on this page are always functional.

Contact:

Your contact page is the place that tells your visitors the best way to get in touch with you. It should be easy to read, easy to find and streamlined for functionality. Instead of choosing to post a generic email address on your page, consider using a simple form that will send you the information immediately after it has been submitted. This lets your visitor know you got their information, and saves them the step of having to take the time to email you.

If you’re reading Copyblogger or follow Hubspot, you likely understand the power of content marketing, meaning that this is a section of your website that is bound to appear in your navigation setup.

Blog:

This is your time to really shine with any extra information, guides, interaction and tips. Try to keep your posts updated by participating at least once a week, and be sure to break up your posts with good formatting. Include many images that will catch your reader’s eye and be sure to end with your call to action.

If, after reviewing your entire site, you feel that your basics have been covered, there is a good chance that your site is ready to launch right now. In the end, you can always add extra pages later or change things due to additions or plans for the future. Don’t be afraid of exposure!

I have met plenty of people who have had a tough time making their sites ready to go live, and I too know the feeling. If you’re using WordPress, you know that being able to change your look is as easy as switching to a new theme. If you have your site basics taken care of, commit to the site now, making only the most-important changes. Plan for your re-vamp in the future, if your site logistics aren’t working out for you down the road.

Know when to stop.

Your design is done when it’s successfully communicating to visitors what it is your business does and what makes it unique. It’s done when you’ve covered your basics, made yourself clear and it’s easy to use.

Try your best not to hide behind your web design project. Your site is only a means to an end…you, which is much more important than any single web page.

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